Army and Navy technicians prepare unexploded ordnance for demolition in 2003 near Baghdad.

History, Politics, and Those Pesky WMDs

by Doug Howard. Although my Google Chrome home page is set to international.nytimes.com, I get my best news from Facebook. The New York Times is great, but it is so conventional, and the articles are so long! I just want to know what happened overnight, or what someone was thinking while I was asleep. For …

Continue reading History, Politics, and Those Pesky WMDs

Pumpkin Spice Lattes, Maraschino Cherries, and the Meaning of Autumn

by Kristin Du Mez. It’s that time again. The air is turning crisp, the leaves are turning colors, and all thoughts turn to…pumpkin spice. (Actually, just like Christmas shopping starts earlier and earlier each year, pumpkin spice season seems to be inching forward each year as well; this year’s first sightings came as early as …

Continue reading Pumpkin Spice Lattes, Maraschino Cherries, and the Meaning of Autumn

Ancestral Journeys

by Will Katerberg My blood is about 2.5 percent Neanderthal and 1.8 percent Denisovan. My colleagues and wife say they’re not surprised. The evidence indicates, however, that all non-Africans are about 2 percent Neanderthal and just under 2 percent Denisovan. These discoveries are fascinating stories, and they have been a challenge for scientists and theologians. …

Continue reading Ancestral Journeys

16th century Aztec illustration depicting a god wearing a human skin.

The Christian Historian, the Bible, and “Secular” History

Part 3 of the Integration of Faith & History in the Classroom series by Dan Miller. For me as a Christian believer as well as a historian, the Bible represents a bit of a conundrum. While it is relatively easy to see that the beginning chapters of Genesis and the concluding chapters of Revelation are “poetic” …

Continue reading The Christian Historian, the Bible, and “Secular” History

Cover of the book Half Has Never Been Told by Edward Baptist

The Half Has Never Been Told

by Jim Bratt. From time to time I like to use this blog to air out some conversation, or combat, going on inside the guild of American historians. The arguments never stop, with the happy consequence that we members of the profession are kept in work. But sometimes things get tiresome. That’s the case with …

Continue reading The Half Has Never Been Told