I Rise to Speak in Favor of the Discipline I Taught

by Bob Schoone-Jongen In the wake of President Trump’s embrace of “patriotic history” at the National Archives on Thursday, I rise to speak in favor of the discipline I taught, studied, researched, and wrote about for decades. I also rise to oppose categorically the debauched definition of history he espoused in that hallowed national space …

Continue reading I Rise to Speak in Favor of the Discipline I Taught

Our Fathers’ Freedom: The American Revolution and the COVID Crisis

by Will C. De Man In the days of the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans are filled with a general feeling of anxiety and worry. For some, it’s anxiety over how they’ll keep up their rent or pay their bills. Others worry for their sick or elderly loved ones, who are particularly at risk. Still others have …

Continue reading Our Fathers’ Freedom: The American Revolution and the COVID Crisis

The Pope and the Plague

by Frans van Liere. In 1348, a terrible epidemic arrived in Avignon. It had spread from Italy, but its origins were somewhere in Central Asia, on what is now the border between Xinjiang and Kyrgyzstan. For the next seven months, the Black Death ravaged this small city on the Rhone river in southern France, and …

Continue reading The Pope and the Plague

“Digging In” to a Company’s History

by Bob Schoone-Jongen During the spring of 2017, I received a request to help compile the history of the Braen Stone Company, headquartered in Haledon, New Jersey. The company has been in business since 1904, owned by the same family for five generations. The owners hoped to mark their 115th anniversary with a coffee table …

Continue reading “Digging In” to a Company’s History

Northern Ireland’s Fragile Peace

by Kate van Liere This past Easter season witnessed many tragic outbursts of sectarian hatred around the globe, from slaughter of Sri Lankan Christians on Easter Sunday to the Passover shooting at a San Diego synagogue by a Christian white supremacist two days later. In Ireland—where my husband Frans and I spent ten days of …

Continue reading Northern Ireland’s Fragile Peace

The Personal is Historical

by Eric M. Washington Next Monday is Emancipation Day in most of the Caribbean and in some places in the African Diaspora. Slavery ended in the British West Indies in August 1834 (though four years of an “apprenticeship” period stretched “unfree” labor to 1838). I had planned to write about Frederick Douglass’ Emancipation Day speech …

Continue reading The Personal is Historical